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RedCliff Ascent offers long term positive results to teens and families


By Stephen C. Schultz


Research Link – A Comparison Group Study (Time limited link)
Highlights
  • This comparison group study looked at the impact of Outdoor Behavioral Healthcare longitudinally on youth participants as reported by their parents.
  • Findings showed that youth participant’s one-year post participation in OBH treatments were functioning significantly better than youth who remained in their communities.
  • Regression analysis showed the only significant predictor of change was participation in the treatment group.


Dr. Steven DeMille

~Outdoor Behavioral Healthcare Model program offers long term positive results to teens and families~

In 2007, Dr. Steven DeMille found himself working as a field guide in the back country of extreme Southwestern Utah. He was in charge of the activities of daily living for a group of nine students who were enrolled at RedCliff Ascent. Steve, as well as two or three other staff members who were responsible for the student’s safety, taught hard skills such as hiking, setting up camp, cooking over a fire, building a fire, staying warm etc. He was also proficient at the softer skills of group communication and emotional regulation when students would become frustrated or angry.


At this time in his life, Steve seemed to have more in common with “Grizzly Adams” than he did the modern perception of a researcher and international speaker. However, Steve was consumed by the thought; “These kids are making visible progress and leaving Redcliff with a renewed perspective, positive energy and sense of accomplishment.”
In the years that followed, Dr. DeMille has emerged as one of the world’s foremost experts on Outdoor Behavioral Healthcare. He is an integral part of the OBH organization and has collaborated and presented internationally from Prague to Australia.
His latest research effort, which you can access through this link, is ground breaking in its complexity. He was actually able to compare the outcomes of students who attended one of the Outdoor Behavioral Healthcare programs (RedCliff Ascent) to a cohort of students who did not attend the program, but received therapeutic service at home.


“Every living person has some kind of struggle. Some of us have trouble with relationships, some of us have trouble coping with day to day life and some of us have mental health concerns that are not apparent at first glance. There is hope for families! There is help for teens.” Says DeMille.

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