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The Ambush

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By Stephen C. Schultz

His breathing was heavy and fast. Mucus sprayed from his nostrils and his cheeks fought the g-forces as if he were a fighter pilot leaving the deck of an aircraft carrier in an F-16. His neck muscles strained and his face grimaced as the fight or flight response kicked in. Five; six; seven now eight steps into his evasive action that was steeped in athletic prowess and natural instinct, he thought he was in the clear. Once again, he had cheated death and the angels of mercy had looked down upon him.

It didn’t register right away. With each step, the distance grew larger between him and his immediate threat. It shouldn’t have happened this way. There was so much to live for. He was in the prime of his life with family and friends who loved and cared about him. He didn’t want it to end this way.


The pain was quick and sharp. It penetrated right in the square of his back between his shoulder blades. His chest was thrust forward and his arms flew into the air and backw…

Guiding the Discussion of PSB with Families

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By Stephen C. Schultz


As a clinician, just about everyone has dealt with clients who share very personal, intimate and poignant information with us. There is a trust and therapeutic alliance that we hope to establish over time. I would bet that most of us have also worked with clients who share only partial information. They aren’t quite ready to “spill all of the beans”.
I want to reach out in a helpful manner concerning conversations you may have with families pertaining to Problematic Sexual Behavior (PSB) and teenagers. I’ve been thinking a lot about a recent conference I attended in San Antonio, Texas. I had conversations with no fewer than seven clinicians and allied health professionals about families and students that are struggling with PSB, yet the families are hesitant to address the issues head on.


It is obvious that when a family is resistant to working on these very sensitive issues that it puts you, as the clinician, in a very awkward position concerning the family, othe…

Trust and Respect - The Value of RedCliff Ascent

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By Stephen C. Schultz

The fire has almost died. The embers are glowing a light orange with grey ashes sneaking up around them. Some of the other students are getting ready to slip into their wiggy’s. He could sit here all night, just looking at the stars. They don’t look this bright at home. Everything seems clearer out here. He looks across the fire where Scott is sitting. Scott, or Medicine Bull as he is known, gives him a head nod and asks how he is doing on his fires. He remembers the first time he busted a fire with only his bow and drill set. Scott showed him the way. Scott never makes him talk. Through his example he simply encourages him to try.


RedCliff students learn firsthand the power of teamwork and the importance of individual contribution. They also learn they can count on their counselors. Staff members eat, dress, hike and otherwise live in the back country no differently than the students they lead. The result is the development, over time, of mutual trust and respec…