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Teen Sexual Concerns & Therapeutic Insight

By Stephen C. Schultz


Todd Spaulding, LCSW, CSAT is also the Clinical Director at Oxbow Academy. Recently he presented at the International Institute for Trauma & Addiction Professionals (IITAP) conference in Arizona. Therapists from around the globe gathered to discuss and learn the latest therapeutic techniques and interventions for those who struggle with sexual trauma and addiction concerns. Todd was able to train specifically on working with adolescents.

For those colleagues who specialize in adolescent treatment, Oxbow Academy represents a blending of best practices and philosophy from RedCliff AscentDiscovery AcademyDiscovery Ranch to serve the sexually dependent and reactive teen population. Oxbow Academy provides a customized and personalized intervention for students suffering with very sensitive and emotional issues.

(www.oxbowacademy.net)

Students struggling with Problematic Sexual Behavior (PSB) in a general therapeutic residential setting tend to isolate themselves, cause "Behind the Scenes" disruption in the program culture and they struggle to adequately deal with their treatment issues. They also pose some liability concerns for the program should they decide to act out with other students. These students need a very specific treatment regimen.

Oxbow Academy


About half of our current student population comes to us from other treatment facilities or wilderness programs. Often, the educational consultants, outpatient therapists and other treating professionals mention that the parents didn't identify any sexual issues or volunteer information concerning any misconduct. The truth is, the parents may not have known.  

Our experience has shown that these students are great at playing “information poker”. They may lay down one card, but will hold many more close to their chest. So, we work with these students through a very specific disclosure process. This disclosure combined with psychological and sexual risk assessment testing, provides the treatment team, student and family the necessary knowledge and trust to start the healing process.

We know from experience that this treatment issue is a sensitive one for all involved, especially the parents. The parents we are currently working with have concerns about their son being labeled and only wish for him to live a happy normal life. That is why we use an experiential, relationship based approach at Oxbow so each student has a well rounded therapeutic and educational experience with us.

Please don’t hesitate to contact Tiffany Silva, LCSW with any questions. Tiffany is also willing to staff a case with you if needed. Oxbow regularly manages a waiting list because of the small population and personalized service. So, clinicians and other allied professionals can be assured there will be no pressure for “admission”. 

Tiffany can be reached at 435-469-0683 or by email at Tiffanys@oxbowacademy.net.  

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