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What is the price of integrity?

By Stephen C. Schultz


I got home from work the other evening and my wife was on the phone with the local Pizza place.

She asked me if I would go pick up the pizza. So, I got back in the car and off I went to get the pizza. I walked in the door of the pizza place and there was a line of ten or so people. Some were ordering and others were simply there to pick up their pizza like me.

The young lady behind the register was very pleasant and spoke in broken English. It was apparent that she struggled to make change, even with the register doing most of the work.


I stepped to the counter when it was my turn and gave her my name. She turned and grabbed the pizza, looked at the receipt, and told me the total with tax. I had already figured that I was to receive $2.38 in change. When she handed me my change, I folded the two bills in half and slipped the coins in my pocket. I headed out the door and towards my car. I was juggling the pizza boxes and the dollar bills as I leaned down to open the car door. I put the pizza on the front seat, stood up, and glanced at the bills as I went to put them in my pocket. The bill on top was a $5.00 bill!

The line inside was just as long as before.

I know what I did...I'm interested to know what you would do! Please share!

Comments

Beau Hodson said…
Walk right back to the cashier and hand her the $5 back, getting the $1. Make sure the people in line can hear your explanation. Not only does it get them thinking about integrity by witnessing a good deed but it would also negate their potential to complain when you walk right up to the front. Regarding whether one should wait in line again or not, there is no reason to do, you already waited in line once and it was their mistake. You have no duty to wait in line again.

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