Skip to main content

Battling the "Revolving Door" of Recovery


By Stephen C. Schultz


Her steps were slow and steady. The red rocks below her feet and the azure blue sky overhead created a remarkably beautiful scene. She had a sense of peacefulness and a calm demeanor she had never felt before. This was an adventure she previously would not have appreciated were it not for her family recommending she get some help one more time.



It's hard to believe it has only been three weeks. Usually she didn't like the wide open spaces. She craved the flurry of crowded parties, the nightlife of clubs and the excitement that social media afforded her. She was like a cat chasing its tail, always searching for the next thrilling experience, but never finding it. She found herself in more and more compromising positions and taking unnecessary risks. The feelings of embarrassment had long ago subsided and she numbly accepted each new day.

Her family was concerned. There were regular fights and hurt feelings. They painfully witnessed the twinkle in her eyes fade and a sad hollowness consume her. It was time to intervene yet again...and they were pleased that she lowered her guard just enough to agree.



RedCliff Recovery is an adventure based Outdoor Behavioral Healthcare program. It is specifically designed by women for women who are seeking active recovery from substance use disorder and other co-occurring issues. 

Participants use the wilderness as a way to disrupt the compulsive patterns of unhealthy thought and behavior. In the wilderness environment, our clients are able to focus on recovery and start repairing the relationships they have harmed with their friends, their family and above all, themselves. Living day to day in the back country allows each individual to detoxify both physically and emotionally. They are actively involved in an individual treatment plan that may include; mindfulness, narrative family therapy, the 12-steps, personal reflection, adventure based activities and the exploration of spirituality. A clean diet and regular exercise also contribute to a more healthy therapeutic process.



As mentioned, this program is exclusively for women, ages 18-26. Recovery can be a scary thing to consider, but it's always a comfort to know that you are in the firm and loving arms of Mother Nature!

To learn more, click the link to the short video below.





Be sure to contact Darcy if you have any questions. She is here to assist in helping you learn more about RedCliff Recovery and the journey to sobriety. Darcy will answer questions, inspire hope, show the way and walk beside you throughout the process. It's not only what she does...it's simply who she is.

Darcy Holt
Admissions
+1-801-370-2274
www.redcliffrecovery.com 

RedCliff Recovery is also a proud member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Programs (NAATP). Together, we can instill hope, fight treatment fraud, heal families and help individuals flourish!








Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Lessons I learned from a childhood experience with bullying

By Stephen C. Schultz The dew around the window was starting to bead up. In a classic case of chaos theory, the little beads of water gave way to gravity and randomly bounced and bumped their way to the window sill like a steal marble in a pinball game. There was a small pool of water in the cracked and peeling beige paint. I sat facing the window, staring at the small engraved stone nestled in the flower beds. There weren’t many flowers at this time of year. Mostly rhododendrons and Oregon grapes reaching skyward from the damp bark mulch that covered the planter area.   The month of January in Eugene Oregon was filled with days and days of mist and fog.   In fact, pretty much from October through June was filled with fog, rain, mist, showers, freezing rain and occasionally snow. The local weathermen didn’t bother with predictions about the chance of precipitation; they took pride in developing new adjectives to describe the type of precipitation and how much you can expect.

Perfectly Wicked - A new take on an old fairy tale!

Guest Blogger Amanda Schultz Age 15 There she was…hair as black as night, lips as red as blood, skin as white as snow. Standing by the window, washing dishes, whistling while she worked. Snow White. I shudder with disgust every time I hear her name. What kind of a name is that anyway? “Snow White”. Gahhh, it’s a name that practically begs to be made fun of. Yet, there she goes, frolicking around like she owns the Enchanted Forest. No. I’m the Queen. I’m in charge. My magic mirror was mistaken. I’m the Fairest of them all, not that sorry excuse for a princess. One bite from my poison apple and that air-head will be so ugly not even her mother could love her. And I will be the Fairest once again! I suppose that I should rewind a little bit. It wasn’t always a competition between Snow White and me. In fact, back in the day, we had a nice little system going on. I would rule the kingdom and practice my magic, while Snow did the dishes and tended the garden. She stayed out of my w

"Sugar and Spice" - A Child's Kindness

By Stephen C. Schultz I recall a childhood rhyme that went something like this; “…sugar and spice and everything nice…that’s what little girls are made of!” As the father of three daughters and one son, there is no doubt about the truthfulness of that saying. I was in San Diego a couple of weeks ago with my family. We were down at Seaport Village right on the bay having lunch. It was a beautiful day, sun shining, light breeze and we were eating on an outside deck. We were engaged in a conversation about what we wanted to do later that day when I noticed my youngest daughter, a fifth grader, was focused on something else. So, I turned to see what she was gazing at. She was following the movements of a transient man who had walked up onto the deck and was systematically searching the garbage cans for food. He was looking in each receptacle and reaching in to move the contents around. At one can, his hand came out with a partially eaten sandwich of some kind. He reached back