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Navigating the rough waters of ADHD

By Stephen C. Schultz



Now that we are in the heart of the Holiday Season, it is easy to ascribe some childhood behaviors to excitement and anticipation of gifts. There are high fat foods and sugary treats that affect energy levels and metabolism. Everywhere you turn there are high stimulus lights, sounds and decorations.

While that may be the cause of some hyper behaviors, those who have children who suffer with ADHD know all too well there is much more to this physical ailment than meets the eye. Parents often describe embarrassing moments while in public and constant calls from schools. There are frustrating interactions, arguing and exhaustive research flanked by trips to the doctor and medication.




If you are new to the overwhelming world of having a child diagnosed with ADHD, I hope you find this information helpful and encouraging. If you are an old pro at this and a seasoned parent with lots of experience, I hope you will feel encouraged in your commitment and efforts. Feel free to share this information with family and friends who might find themselves  navigating the rough waters of ADHD.


ADHD and Addiction: What is the Risk?

ADD / ADHD and School: Helping Children and Teens with ADHD Succeed at School

ADHD and Learning Disabilities: School Help

College Assistance Guide for People with ADHD

The Best Software and Gadgets for ADHD Students

The Ultimate ADHD Apps Guide: 18 Apps to Make Managing Your ADHD Simpler

Strategies to Empower, Not Control, Kids Labeled ADD/ADHD

How Dogs Can Help People with ADD & ADHD

ADHD and Stress: Does One Cause the Other?

ADHD and Coexisting Conditions: ADHD, Sleep and Sleep Disorders

Here is one more link to a blog post on my blog where I discuss my daughters struggle with seizures and the fight to avoid "Labels" when it come to a diagnosis. You can read that article below.

A diagnosis is not a label. Building resilience!

Comments

What you feel inside reflects on your face. So be happy and positive all the time.

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