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Natural Horsemanship and Parenting – Similarities?

By Stephen C. Schultz

When it comes to parenting techniques and styles, there is no shortage of clinical experts as well as self proclaimed self-help guru’s. There are books, webinars, CD’s and videos. These parenting resources offer help for everything from bedwetting to autism to substance abuse.


Every parent knows there are times for obedience and there are times for compliance. But this is certainly not most of the time. Parenting is about relationships and mutual understanding. It’s about teaching and learning and growing together. However, as parents, we have life experience that our children and teens do not; therefore they are not our peers.

Yet, parenting can be fun! Time spent at ballgames, vacations, dance performances, piano recitals and simply sitting around the dining room table create memories and shared experiences. It’s through meaningful time together that loving relationships are fostered and trust and respect is developed.
Sometimes, regardless of the home environment, teens may struggle with some emotional or behavioral concerns. Sometimes, teens view themselves as the center of the universe and parents need to reach out to professionals to assist with reinserting their teen back into the parent-child relationship.


Take a look at this short video snippet that features Jerry Christensen, a professional horseman at Discovery Ranch. If parents are seeking an honest, trusting relationship with their teen, then maybe these principles used with horses can also apply to kids! Check it out!

Comments

Absolutely brilliant video! Parents of teenagers could really learn a lot from the gentle and respectful way this gentle man is training horses to cooperate and grow.
judithwelltree said…
Absolutely brilliant post! Amazing how powerful it is to use a completely different situation to illustrate such a vital relationship shift! Thank you, I shall be saving this one!
Unknown said…
Wonderful video and article. I agree one of the most important ingredients in life is to distinguish between thinking and feeling. Often we give up far too soon, only because we try to force a desire quicker than the heart can resolve the issues within the mind. Sometimes giving up is in the form of trying to force a meeting of the two creating an even larger issue. Thank you for sharing. Fantastic article and video. Hugs, Sho
Thanks so much Sho Nique for your wonderful insight! I appreciate the comment!

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