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When work is an adventure!

By Stephen C. Schultz


The sky was overcast and there was a crisp chill in the air. The roof tops of the neighboring houses all had the unmistakable white fluffy stuff so affectionately called snow. This would normally not be of any consequence at the foot of the 10,000 foot mountains. However, flowers were springing up, grass was turning green and we had already gotten used to warmer temperatures. Weather in these parts of the country can be a roller coaster at best.



So, I stepped out of my car and into the wind. I made my way to the door of my office. I walked past the reception desk and Andrea caught my eye and motioned me over. She said there was someone on the phone line that wanted more information about our Wilderness Therapy Program. She asked if I would be willing to speak with this person.

Andrea transferred the call to my cell phone and I introduced myself. The lady calling mentioned she was from Arizona and had watched some of the video’s about RedCliff Acsent on YouTube. This type of therapeutic intervention intrigued her and she decided to call. She had a number of questions that she was asking me. There were questions about length of stay, how much it costs and what the therapy was like. There were some questions about family involvement and the food the kids eat. We talked about weekend camping and how powerful that can be and the differences between RedCliff Ascent and an adventure weekend experience.



As I was thinking about this conversation, there is a specific aspect I thought I would share. Part of our conversation grew out of the question;

“What kind of training does your staff have?”

I shared with her some answers that can be found on the employment website for RedCliff Ascent called Wilderness Work.  If you have an interest in working with teens and helping families improve their relationships, then this career may be of interest to you. Check it out!


Comments

Perlman said…
this is really an informational post. I like it .keep it up. I've got more things about camping. I love camping so much.

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