Skip to main content

What's the best way to deal with "Failure To Launch"?

By Stephen C. Schultz


There is a record number of people living in multi-generational household's with parents and grandparents. The poor economy and weak job market is a reality. Most families in the United States and many from around the world recognize the economy is a problem that needs rectified. Regardless of political persuasion, there is an impact felt by those who are retired, or about to retire. These “Baby Boomers” in the U.S. as well as families around the world are faced with adult children who never leave “the nest”. Even when their children go off to University, they are often financially and socially encumbered by young adults who spread their wings in the search for independence after graduation, only to return home discouraged.


The Pew Research Center found in a recent study, that 58 million Americans live in multi-generational homes. adult children between the ages of 25 to 34 living with their parents doubled between 1980 and 2012. We also know that 59% of American parents provide financial support to their adult children according to a May 2011 study done by Harris Interactive, commissioned by the National Endowment for Financial Education and Forbes.com.

The vast majority of families will endure this hardship in stride. It may be uncomfortable, but most parents and young adults will manage. However, there are some young adults who find it difficult to “enter adulthood” because of a long history of emotional concerns such as depression, anxiety, social phobias, substance use or technology addiction. Many find themselves comfortable living in the safe environment of home. Other young adults may go off to college and get discouraged, party too much, fail in their academics and simply drop out. Then there are the students who graduate college, but find it difficult to gain employment. They get frustrated and regress into partying and gaming.

No matter the reason, Failure To Launch is a reality that some families struggle to cope with. If determination, courage, insight, self-awareness and respect are needed, then Medicine Wheel at RedCliff Ascent may be the answer. Check it out!





Comments

Popular posts from this blog

"Sugar and Spice" - A Child's Kindness

By Stephen C. Schultz I recall a childhood rhyme that went something like this; “…sugar and spice and everything nice…that’s what little girls are made of!” As the father of three daughters and one son, there is no doubt about the truthfulness of that saying. I was in San Diego a couple of weeks ago with my family. We were down at Seaport Village right on the bay having lunch. It was a beautiful day, sun shining, light breeze and we were eating on an outside deck. We were engaged in a conversation about what we wanted to do later that day when I noticed my youngest daughter, a fifth grader, was focused on something else. So, I turned to see what she was gazing at. She was following the movements of a transient man who had walked up onto the deck and was systematically searching the garbage cans for food. He was looking in each receptacle and reaching in to move the contents around. At one can, his hand came out with a partially eaten sandwich of some kind. He reached back

Fishing...It's really about relationships!

By Stephen C. Schultz Spring is in the air and that well known feeling of wanting to get out of the house and go fishing is surging through my body. I found myself in a sporting goods store the other day perusing the fishing lure isle. I was in the yard after mowing the lawn and realized I was walking around my small 12 foot fishing boat that is still covered from winter. I have had people ask me over the years, "What's so fun about fishing?". They usually follow that question up with, "It's so boring!". From my perspective, they couldn't be further from the truth. Fishing represents so much more than being entertained. It's time in the wilderness with fresh air and solitude. It's time to think and ponder on life's problems.  It time to express gratitude and count your blessings. There is also the satisfaction of reading the water, observing a hatch and placing a lure or fly in the perfect spot. It's the excitement of the fish

Lessons I learned from a childhood experience with bullying

By Stephen C. Schultz The dew around the window was starting to bead up. In a classic case of chaos theory, the little beads of water gave way to gravity and randomly bounced and bumped their way to the window sill like a steal marble in a pinball game. There was a small pool of water in the cracked and peeling beige paint. I sat facing the window, staring at the small engraved stone nestled in the flower beds. There weren’t many flowers at this time of year. Mostly rhododendrons and Oregon grapes reaching skyward from the damp bark mulch that covered the planter area.   The month of January in Eugene Oregon was filled with days and days of mist and fog.   In fact, pretty much from October through June was filled with fog, rain, mist, showers, freezing rain and occasionally snow. The local weathermen didn’t bother with predictions about the chance of precipitation; they took pride in developing new adjectives to describe the type of precipitation and how much you can expect.