Skip to main content

Lessons From A Nine Year Old!

By Stephen C. Schultz


The morning was cool, the air was thin. Dew on the grass sparkled a million flashes as the sun peaked over the snow capped mountain. April, at 5000 feet above sea level, is a beautiful time of year. The valleys are green with spring growth and the mountains retain their white-tipped majesty.

This particular morning was not only invigorating to the soul; it also ushered in the day that my 9 year old daughter was performing in the ritualistic yearly classroom school play. She had some speaking parts as well as singing parts in this youthful exercise of dramatic passion.


We drove to the school and parked in the over crowded parking lot. Parents and students, hand in hand, weaved in and out of parked vehicles in a steady flow that culminated in a bottle neck at the southeast entrance to the school. The walk down the hallway was brisk as we moved like salmon making their way up stream. As we stepped to the door of my daughter’s classroom, she stopped to show me artwork on the walls depicting butterflies, flowers, caterpillars, green grass and sunny skies! She pointed to hers with pride. It’s funny how the artwork of your child can rival that of Monet and Renoir.


We turned and entered the classroom. There were chairs set up in rows and a few parents mingling in the corner of the classroom. Her young Twenty-Something teacher made her way across the room and in a friendly gesture shook my hand. She said, “Hi Amanda, I’m so glad you made it…is this your Grandpa?”

Wow! Talk about awkward! My daughter just crinkled her brow and in a somewhat confused tone of voice said, “No, this is my dad.” The poor teacher flushed red. There was no graceful way out of this one. I chuckled and said, “It’s the grey in my hair. I get that all the time”, even though this was the first time. Her teacher apologized and quickly made her way to the door to greet another child and parent coming in the classroom.

The play was a hit! The kids did well, and even though there were no Oscar’s given out this night; each parent thought their student was the star. This was a time for parents and students to create memories. For many, this was simply another night at the school, but for one parent, it was a subtle reminder that time is a precious thing.

Comments

DJ Cadenhead g+reader said…
My (probable) friend: Do not feel alone. I had dedicated my life to learning a career such that I was 40 before I realized that I had no Younguns. My daughter, now fourteen, has now grown to the point that some folks think I am an old geezer , robbing the cradle, and seeking out poor innocent, naive young women for "Arm Candy." All I need is a jet black toupe'.It has become endearing and funny, our own joke on the world.--djc
Thanks for the comment DJ! While a jet black toupe' is unlikely, I do have a full head of silver/grey. I still have a 12 yr old as well...
Carolyn Schultz said…
However, I remember when you were an adorable little tow-head.....and you are right, time "flies on wings of lightning" Love you forever, Mom
Thanks so much mom! Love you too!

Popular posts from this blog

Lessons I learned from a childhood experience with bullying

By Stephen C. Schultz The dew around the window was starting to bead up. In a classic case of chaos theory, the little beads of water gave way to gravity and randomly bounced and bumped their way to the window sill like a steal marble in a pinball game. There was a small pool of water in the cracked and peeling beige paint. I sat facing the window, staring at the small engraved stone nestled in the flower beds. There weren’t many flowers at this time of year. Mostly rhododendrons and Oregon grapes reaching skyward from the damp bark mulch that covered the planter area.   The month of January in Eugene Oregon was filled with days and days of mist and fog.   In fact, pretty much from October through June was filled with fog, rain, mist, showers, freezing rain and occasionally snow. The local weathermen didn’t bother with predictions about the chance of precipitation; they took pride in developing new adjectives to describe the type of precipitation and how much you can expect.

"Sugar and Spice" - A Child's Kindness

By Stephen C. Schultz I recall a childhood rhyme that went something like this; “…sugar and spice and everything nice…that’s what little girls are made of!” As the father of three daughters and one son, there is no doubt about the truthfulness of that saying. I was in San Diego a couple of weeks ago with my family. We were down at Seaport Village right on the bay having lunch. It was a beautiful day, sun shining, light breeze and we were eating on an outside deck. We were engaged in a conversation about what we wanted to do later that day when I noticed my youngest daughter, a fifth grader, was focused on something else. So, I turned to see what she was gazing at. She was following the movements of a transient man who had walked up onto the deck and was systematically searching the garbage cans for food. He was looking in each receptacle and reaching in to move the contents around. At one can, his hand came out with a partially eaten sandwich of some kind. He reached back

Perfectly Wicked - A new take on an old fairy tale!

Guest Blogger Amanda Schultz Age 15 There she was…hair as black as night, lips as red as blood, skin as white as snow. Standing by the window, washing dishes, whistling while she worked. Snow White. I shudder with disgust every time I hear her name. What kind of a name is that anyway? “Snow White”. Gahhh, it’s a name that practically begs to be made fun of. Yet, there she goes, frolicking around like she owns the Enchanted Forest. No. I’m the Queen. I’m in charge. My magic mirror was mistaken. I’m the Fairest of them all, not that sorry excuse for a princess. One bite from my poison apple and that air-head will be so ugly not even her mother could love her. And I will be the Fairest once again! I suppose that I should rewind a little bit. It wasn’t always a competition between Snow White and me. In fact, back in the day, we had a nice little system going on. I would rule the kingdom and practice my magic, while Snow did the dishes and tended the garden. She stayed out of my w