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What is the meaning of work?

By Stephen C. Schultz


"The two best ways to find meaning in life are to develop meaningful relationships and meaningful work." ~ Viktor Frankl

"Work is a very important part of human development. It is an entry way into society. It is how people become integrated into their communities." ~ Jared C. Schultz PhD




Jared Schultz (My brother) did not want to be a mortician when he grew up. The interest survey he took as a sophomore in high school missed the mark. He didn't think that formaldehyde and embalming fluid was the way to a girls heart!

He decided he did not want to be an apartment maintenance worker or a painter or a landscaper. These are all very fine careers, but just not for him. How did he know this? He worked at these jobs in high school and during the summers in college.

There is an aspect of work that speaks to us. It is a part of who we are and an integral part of who we want to become.

Fredrick Herzberg mentioned in an article he published in the Harvard Business Review, that salary ranks sixth among motivating factors. When it comes to work, achievement, recognition and engaging in the work itself all came in above salary.

As of October, 2007 approximately 67% of RedCliff Ascent field staff are college graduates. Most of our field staff are under contract for periods ranging from 8 to 12 months.

Potential employees must spend six days in the wilderness learning the pragmatics of field management as well as core policies designed to keep students safe and magnify growth opportunities.


A three week internship is also required prior to employment. During this time, interns learn wilderness living skills and observe field staff at work. Interns must also complete the same curriculum as our students. Once hired, field staff receive weekly training from our clinical director and therapy staff on the Developmental Therapeutic Model. 


RedCliff staff are randomly drug tested throughout their employment with a comprehensive urine screen. All employees must pass a background check.


Why Do I Care?

Therapy is provided by licensed clinicians.  Field staff are carefully screened. Since therapy often happens at the point of contact, our field staff are specifically trained to complement the clinical goals.


If you, or someone you know is interested in developing courage, determination, compassion and purpose, then you may want to explore this short video. Take a look...you may even chuckle a bit!



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