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Showing posts from September, 2011

Fathers, Family, Football and the Frustrated Pre-Teen!

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By Stephen C. Schultz


I received a call from a friend the other day. She was sharing with me some changes that were taking place in her life concerning career and a move. She mentioned she was excited about new opportunities for work and that she would be moving closer to her extended family in Southern California where she was raised.

She said, “I haven’t told my kids yet! They will go crazy…they love hanging out with their cousins!”
In the course of our conversation, she made a comment about my blog. She said she loved the personal stories and some of the “lessons” learned.
I jokingly said, “Well, things have been so busy lately, I haven’t been observant of my surroundings”.
This is the back story that brings me to this moment, writing of family time, observations and lessons learned. I’m going to share a scenario that thousands of families across the country will probably relate to in one way or another.
For the last three years, we have been season college football ticket holders to m…

Lessons I learned from a childhood experience with bullying

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By Stephen C. Schultz


The dew around the window was starting to bead up. In a classic case of chaos theory, the little beads of water gave way to gravity and randomly bounced and bumped their way to the window sill like a steal marble in a pinball game. There was a small pool of water in the cracked and peeling beige paint.



I sat facing the window, staring at the small engraved stone nestled in the flower beds. There weren’t many flowers at this time of year. Mostly rhododendrons and Oregon grapes reaching skyward from the damp bark mulch that covered the planter area.The month of January in Eugene Oregon was filled with days and days of mist and fog.In fact, pretty much from October through June was filled with fog, rain, mist, showers, freezing rain and occasionally snow. The local weathermen didn’t bother with predictions about the chance of precipitation; they took pride in developing new adjectives to describe the type of precipitation and how much you can expect.
For first graders …

International Boarding School Educates Struggling Students From Around The World

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By Stephen C. Schultz


“English usage is sometimes more than mere taste, judgment, and education – sometimes it’s sheer luck, like getting across the street.” ~ E.B. White


Discovery Academy (DA), a flagship Boarding School that enrolls students aged 13-18, is a great educational opportunity for the foreign student who would benefit from an international experience. DA specializes in providing academic services to students that are bright under-achievers who may also struggle with depression, anxiety or substance abuse issues. Many students may lack the emotional maturity necessary or grades to get accepted to a top tier US Boarding School. Foreign students can graduate from DA with an accreditedDiscovery Academy Diploma and transition right to American Universities.Discovery Academy is F-1 Student Visa Certified and I-20 approved.



In standard academic systems around the world, time is the constant and learning is the variable. In other words, students begin the year and systematically mov…

Teen Sexual Issues - A New Treatment Approach

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By Stephen C. Schultz


I recently returned from a visit to California where the clinical director of Oxbow Academy and I met with a family whose son recently graduated from Oxbow. This meeting was to "check in" with the family, see how things were going and assist in realigning any expectations that may be unmet. The one thing that is glaringly apparent is that the students come home with a maturity level and insight unmatched by their peers. As we work with these families, that are truly pioneers in their persistence and dedication to their sons, we have noticed some trends.

About sixty percent of the students have come to us from other residential placements, wilderness treatment programs or outpatient therapists. The other trend is similar in percentage, sixty percent, but represents students that are adopted. We’re not quite sure what to make of this yet, but it’s interesting none the less.



Here are some brief Oxbow Academy statistics;

100% - Students that struggle with addi…